Jul 302014
 

If the bill actually does what it seems to… here we have a new law that’s actually a good idea.

Panel sees ASTEROIDS Act as step in right direction for space property rights

Instead of the “stuff in outer space is the common property of all mankind” bullcrap, this bill would seem to put across the crazy notion that those who go to the bother of actually exploring and exploiting asteroids would actually *own* them.

 Posted by at 12:03 am
  • mzungu

    A waste of government time and money, Russia, China, Japan, EU, UN is all going to ignore it….

    Aside from that, The chance of finding anything on those rocks are so small, when you consider even if you all up all those rocks is is only 4% of the moon and 0.05% of that of earth. So you are 2000X more likely to find it on earth…Stop wasting my taxes. 😀

    • Anonymous

      > The chance of finding anything on those rocks are so small

      Really? No iron, no nickel, no aluminum, silicon or water?

      > you are 2000X more likely to find anything on earth

      You are equally likely to find drinking water in Europe and America. So if you happen to be traveling in the one from the other, are you better off bringing all your water from home, or getting it locally?

      • mzungu

        Does your analogy include bring a Caterpillar to dig a well, and ship a water purification plant on the plane to Europe? I don’t think I want my government to pay for that plane ticket. 🙂

        • Peter Hanely

          For a quick trip carrying the supply can make more sense than the machinery to produce locally. If you’re going for a prolonged stay the economics change.

          • mzungu

            Even that, I think mining the asteroid is crazy business. I think if anyone want Space Platinum, get it from a place with some gravity, because if you ever visit a mining site, aside from the huge facility, there is a even bigger pile of tailing. That is basically the unwanted lose rocks, waste product, useless crap which constitute 99%+ of the rocks u dig up for processing..

            On earth the trailing falls into a nice pile, on an asteroid, it is floating space debris/hazard around your mining site that you can’t imagine. Who ever think they can all just put it in a nice bag had obviously never been to a mining site or smelter..

          • Anonymous

            Who said anything about platinum for first gen space mining? They’re mostly after *water*.

          • mzungu

            Same thing, you still end up with 99% waste that u need to get rid of in 0-G. most of these water ppl are expecting are most likely in the form of hydrated minerals, that prob seeps into every cracks and crannies and embedded deep down.

            So, same problem. Still needs to breaks the rocks apart, get what you need, and figure out how to manage a mini asteroid field surrounding the asteroid.

            Let’s just say…. If someone is going to do this, don’t let them do it in LEO. 😀

          • Anonymous

            > Still needs to breaks the rocks apart, get what you need, and figure out
            how to manage a mini asteroid field surrounding the asteroid.

            And how do you expect space miners to figure out how to do that without actually doing that?

        • Anonymous

          > I don’t think I want my government to pay for that plane ticket. 🙂

          Perhaps not. But if my company is selling a Cat and a water purification plant to Europe, do you really want to set up regulations to stand in the way of that?

          This law isn’t saying that the US government is paying for anything, just that it won’t prevent private enterprise from claiming private property rights over that which it has accessed. And as to whether the likes of Russia and China are going to ignore private property rights of Americans in space… do you honestly think that if the Chinese were to go out and snag a small asteroid, bring it to GEO and reprocess it into a solar power satellite, they’ll share all the energy with the world? If they grab a few hundred tons of cometary ice and return it to LEO, would they split it between their space station and the ISS? Hell no! And nor should they.

          • mzungu

            The law is useless, because you can’t enforce it in a internationally. There isn’t a thing that the US government can do if the Russian chip off a piece of the asteroid that the US manage to tow back to LEO. There is no space cop, and US law/court have no jurisdiction over the other nations.

            So, that is why it is a waste of a congress man’s time, whom you and I are paying for.

          • Anonymous

            You are entirely wrong on two points:
            “The law is useless, because you can’t enforce it in a internationally”
            First off, international law is not the whole of the law. If the US made the mistake of agreeing with the notion that everything in space belongs to all of mankind, then if an American company went out and developed something and tried to make a buck off of it, they’d get in trouble with the US government

            ” There isn’t a thing that the US government can do if the Russian chip off a piece of the asteroid”

            Incorrect. What happens when a foreign government does something inappropriate today? If the US government feels not quite up to dropping a shedload of bombs on them, it can still enact economic sanctions. If the Russian government, or some Russian government-owned company, goes up and steal property belonging to US citizens, then the US government can pursue any number of courses, including seizing relevant Russian assets. When the government of Afghanistan refused to turn over people the US suspected of crimes against American citizens and interests, we bombed them out of power and invaded their lands.

            “US law/court have no jurisdiction over the other nations”

            Tell that to the Iranians. And the Cubans. And the North Koreans. And a whole bunch of Russians.

          • mzungu

            Most space faring nations are little bit more sophisticated than Iraq, and Afghanistan, they do have ICBMs that can reach US soil….so the likelihood of US would risk the lives of US solders and civilians fighting over a piece of rock with China or Russian are ZERO.

            I mean, Did Reagan invaded USSR after they shot down the Korean jet with 62 US citizens? will he do it for an asteroid?

          • Anonymous
  • RoucheX

    No, no, no.

    • Anonymous

      Yes.

      • Anonymous

        If a stadium sized asteroid can pay off the national debt–that is something I do want my gov’t doing. Lead the way, use the Roche limit to segment the asteroid, then land ballutes full of the bits. process on the ground.

  • Joe

    Why does the US believe it can legislate domestically for regions outside its jurisdiction?

    • Anonymous

      Wait… what?

      If I follow your “reasoning” accurately… you would suggest that if, say, the Russian government blew up an American space station in geosynchronous, the US would have *no* recourse since GEO isn’t in US jurisdiction. Or if Somali pirates hijacked an Australian cargo ship in international waters, Australia would have no recourse.