May 312013
 

The Weather Channel has a storm chasing truck, for “Tornado Hunt 2013.” Looks like their hunt was successful!

Apparently the crew was on board when the truck successfully hunted down a tornado and got successfully hurled a reported 200 yards. Injuries were reported to be only minor, which is a tad surprising.

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This video is two years old, was taken by a guy sitting in his truck, talking to his sister on the phone, when a tornado passes *real* close. The guy is the virtual definition of “calm.” He faces death just about as well as a man can.

[youtube aijg8hWU4fM]

 Posted by at 8:21 pm
  • Anonymous

    Well, at least they stuck the landing.

  • publiusr

    The storms usually go from southwest to northeast. Here, they took a jog southeast. It reminded me a bit of grand island: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/gid/?n=gi1980tornado

    The roads were packed–it could have been a mass casualty event

    On-going threat
    http://www.srh.noaa.gov/oun/

    Reed Timmer’s site has nice photos
    https://www.facebook.com/ReedTimmerTVN
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/oklahoma-tornadoes.html

    El Reno wedge
    http://www.stormtrack.org/
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk7LJvjYV9s
    http://www.bnvn.com/bloghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kk7LJvjYV9s

  • B-Sabre

    man, that guy in the second video is a moron. “it doesn’t look dangerous…”

  • publiusr
  • Rick

    American engineering FTW. Let’s see some hippies survive that in their 70’s VW microbus.

  • dickie

    I’ve been that close to a lethal tornado before. I used to work in a cube farm in a windowless warehouse. I was on the second of the floors towards the center of the building, so the outside world was pretty much inaccessible other than what the internet would tell me at the time. This was in the very early stages of the smartphone’s introduction, so there were no weather apps with alerts etc…

    I was pulling some overtime and absorbed in my work, and I finished at some random hour and proceeded to leave the building. It was raining outside but other than that, no indication of any especially severe weather. I got in my car, exited the parking lot and merged onto the highway towards home just as marble-sized hail suddenly started to fall. Suddenly there was a column of dark gray approaching me from me left, moving directly towards me. Nobody was on the freeway, but I was over a mile from the next exit. I pulled off the shoulder into the grass and made my way down the slope to the access road and parked under the nearest overpass and just wondered whether it would be enough to save me. I remember thinking of my (then) fiancee and wishing I’d called her before I left work. I thought about my family and offered a concise prayer. The tornado passed over the freeway maybe 50 feet away from where I had parked. If I had tried to make the next exit, I would have ended up directly in its path.

    After it moved past, I got back on the road and headed home as quickly as I could, wanting to avoid closures and cleanup efforts. I later found out that the single fatality was a worker in the building material warehouse immediately to the right of where I’d parked.