A piece of artwork from North American illustrating a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft. This was clearly intended for high speed… not only does it have four turbojet engines for forward thrust, if also have variable sweep wings. The complexity here is that the wings have embedded lift fans, probably driven be high pressure exhaust gas from two or more of the main turbojets. The ductwork would be impressive.

Role is unclear, but it appears to be a fighter or strike-fighter. Indications of weapons bays on the fuselage underside; at least one forward-firing gun. No other data available.

  • mzungu

    Does it looked like it had 4 jet engine? on top of the 6 fans on the wing. Holy crap, this is like some engineers wet dream… with internal weapon storage, I don’t think it have much from for fuel. It took the Indian 20 years to field their jet, this one can easily takes 30 years to develop.

    • http://twitter.com/AtomicRamjet Adam Holtz

      On the aft end of the top one you can see 4 engine nozzles all lit up. How you’re supposed to go about feeding four turbojets with one inlet on the top is beyond me. It also doesn’t help that the location of the intake indicates that the 4 engines will be subject to a lot of engine face flow distortion and total pressure losses.

  • Cthel

    Variable Sweep and gas-driven lift fans? I would hate to have to design those hinges; presumably whatever they came up with weighed a significant amount.

  • Anthill

    I think the setting of the scene is a good indicator. I’ve encountered in a few books the worry some Cold War AirLand Battle planners had over the Reds knocking out runways in preemptive strikes. Clearly a VTOL would not be limited by a runway that has suddenly acquired a few new 25 meter wide pot holes. This seems a tad bit more sensible than the other plans to overcome this problem I’ve seen, such as the rocket powered area effect sled that would simply fly the aircraft over the gaps until it reached take off speed.

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