Oh, California, how I don’t miss you so.

A little while ago, some California citizens subjects decided to go out and about openly carrying firearms. Keep in mind: this was legal. Plus, they were not *brandishing* their weapons; they were not knocking over gas stations; they were being in no way threatening; they were just going about their day openly armed (kinda… they didn’t actually have any bullets in the guns, which makes ‘em little more than really expensive clubs).

So, what did the California state legislature do? They made it illegal to openly carry long guns.

This is perhaps a good test of whether or not you live in a free society: if you are allowed to do something only so long as you don’t actually do it… you’re not in a free society. But hey, as sort of a compromise the state legislature also raised taxes and has decided that illegal aliens should get taxpayer-funded in-state tuition breaks. Pretty great, right?

Times like this, I’m glad there’s a bloody great deadly desert (called “Nevada”) between California and Utah.

  • mzungu

    It saddens me that you are condoning this kind of action.

    One of the first thing they teach us in gun safety is to treat every weapon as a loaded weapon. How can the public/police tell if a gun is loaded or not in a crowded places like that with some one flashing a weapon like that on the street? Am I or the police suppose to go up to each one of them and ask to check the magazine, and the chamber?

    It is an accident waiting to happen, all that it need is one forgotten round in the chamber, and let that bullet rickashay around the concrete jungle. Something that would even make my range master nervousness, let alone in public.

    Just because there is no law that forbade us to bring a gun to the dinner table, does not mean that our wives and mothers and friends would let us bring our guns to the dinner table. It is just rude, and unsafe.

    I am sadden by the fact that owning a gun in California had became more restrictive, but in this case, I feel that this right was taken away from us, because some of us had decided to abuse those rights.

    • Anonymous

      > How can the public/police tell if a gun is loaded or not

      Why should they care? How can the public/police tell if the pistol I have concealed on me is loaded?

      > Am I or the police suppose to go up to each one of them and ask to check the magazine, and the chamber?

      No. Why should you?

      > It is an accident waiting to happen, all that it need is one forgotten
      round in the chamber, and let that bullet rickashay around the concrete
      jungle.

      How big of a problem is that with concealed carry? Why should it be worse with open carry?

      > Just because there is no law that forbade us to bring a gun to the
      dinner table, does not mean that our wives and mothers and friends would
      let us bring our guns to the dinner table. It is just rude

      Actually, it’s ruder *not* to.

      > some of us had decided to abuse those rights.

      In exactly the same way that someone reading a newspaper on the bus is abusing freedom of the press.

      • mzungu

        > Why should they care?

        I care, because I worry about my own safety, I don’t want to be at the other end of that barrel of a loaded gun. If you have looked at the picture of the link you posted, that gun is pointed right at the cyclist behind him. Do you want the end of that barrel pointed at you?

        > Why should it be worse with open carry?

        Conceal and carry is regulated, where the carrier had bee background checked, where in this incidence it is a free for all… I am worried, because, it could be some one who had not had any sort of safety training and left a round in the chamber.

        >Actually, it’s ruder *not* to.?

        Really. :-) Seriously…. how many time had you actually brought a gun to the dinner table?

        >newspaper + bus + abusing the press?

        Sorry, Have no clue what you just said.

        • Anonymous

          > Do you want the end of that barrel pointed at you?

          Gosh, no! I don;t want *cars* pointed at me either. Better ban ‘em from the roads.

          >I am worried, because, it could be some one who had not had any sort of safety training and left a round in the chamber.

          Gee willickers, you sure are a frightened sort. Have you run the numbers on how often open-carry guns just go off and shoot bystanders?

          > Seriously…. how many time had you actually brought a gun to the dinner table?

          A not uncommon occurrence. To save time, read this: http://up-ship.com/blog/?p=3460

          • mzungu

            No one is talking of banning guns or cars. 2nd Amendment is not going down the trash. We just need rules, we have rules at the gun range, and we need them too, if we are to carry it out in public. Looking at how those fools carrying their fire arm, it does worries me. Carrying a rifle nonchalant like that is not acceptable at the range, why would that be acceptable out in the street?

            I am not scared, I just like to treat my guns with the proper respect. The minute we loses that, we end up stop locking it away properly from you sick son, or we go about doing a straw purchase for some ex-con….or we waving it onto other peoples’s faces on the streets like those fools, we’ll be end up losing more of those rights.

          • Anonymous

            > No one is talking of banning guns

            A *lot* of people are talking of jsut that. They’re couching it in oh-so-reasonable terms, but the overall goal is clear.

            > Carrying a rifle nonchalant like that is not acceptable at the range, why would that be acceptable out in the street?

            Irrelevant to the discussion. Unless, of course, you see someone driving erratically down a street as adequate justification for banning *everyone* from driving down the street.

            >I just like to treat my guns with the proper respect. The minute we loses that, we end up…

            Riiiiiight. Dogs and cats living together, mass hysteria.

          • mzungu

            Well, I am not talking of banning. and if you insist that is my intention u go ahead believing that. and it is relevant, because if someone is using a firearm while drunk or doing something illegal, you are damn right I am taking away his’her right to own a gun.

            hysteria, it is. Hiding behind that “taking my 2nd Amendment away again” instead of talking the finer points of refining an effective gun rules is not going to help us a single bit. Taking that position hadn’t help us any in the last 20 years, and won’t do a thing now. Keep it up, we’ll just keep losing those grounds. We had been! End of discussion.

          • Anonymous

            > I am not talking of banning…

            And yet you seem ok with the idea of banning people from carrying in public.

            > if someone is using a firearm while drunk or doing something illegal,
            you are damn right I am taking away his’her right to own a gun

            Keep shifting that goalpost! While you’re at it, point out where any of these open carry activists were drunk or doing something illegal while carrying.

            > we’ll just keep losing those grounds

            Until a month ago, we’ve been *gaining* ground. Example:

            http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a8/Rtc.gif/300px-Rtc.gif

  • Ken R

    Okay… the thoughts that come to mind…

    In the mid- 60′s, Huey Newton organized a group of Black Panthers to march around on the steps of the California Capitol building as some kind of power statement. Oh, and they were carrying rifles slung on their shoulders. For some reason the Powers That Be waited about forty five years to outlaw this kind of thing. I guess black radicals with guns = OK, white middle age guys with guns = BAD! EVIL!

    On the subject of, “How do you know the rifle isn’t loaded?”, there are these devices called chamber flags. They are a bright color, usually bright orange, and like the name says they go in the chamber and it is not possible to have a round in the chamber with the flag in place. They are common at rifle shooting competitions, both before the match and between stages so the judges and range officers can tell that the rifles are unloaded. I don’t see chamber flags as a blight on me, I think they are a great idea and make shooting matches a lot safer.

    Personally, I’m tired the California legislature has this ongoing contest to see who can come up with the dumbest firearms laws.

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