Apr 192018
 

For the APR Patreon I try to acquire as much interesting aerospace documentation as I can, and these items fall into two categories:

  1. Stuff that I can afford. This stuff winds up in the APR Patreon catalog of potential monthly rewards for patrons.
  2. Stuff I can’t hope to afford.

There’s a lot of the latter category of stuff. Sometimes it’s because the item has a ridiculously high Buy It Now price or starting bid, or because the item will be popular among bidders, or because it’s *really* good/big and thus worth every penny. But unaffordable is unaffordable.

However, there is an option for “stuff I can’t afford:” crowdfunding. I’ve done this a number of times with considerable success, and I’ve just done so again, winning a trio of General Dynamics documents describing a 1965 program to develop a logistics system for extending the Apollo lunar exploration program:

This set of documents was just much too expensive for an individual (well, I’m sure Jeff Bezos or Elon Musk wouldn’t have flinched), but with a group of like-mined funders it came in at $30 per person. So what happens now:

1: I wait for it to show up in the mail.

2: I make a complete set of scans in 300 DPI grayscale (and color, where appropriate) and convert to PDFs

3: I make the scans and PDFs available to funders, generally via Dropbox

4: I find an appropriate archive for the documents, and then donate the originals to them.

5: And that’s it. The files are shared with the funders, but do not appear on future APR Patreon catalogs or as purchasable, downloadable “Diagrams and Documents.” What the funders choose to do with their scans & PDFs is up to them.

APR Patrons get alerted to each of these occasional “crowdfunding opportunities.” So if you’d like to participate, please considered signing up for the APR Patreon.

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 Posted by at 12:11 pm
Feb 152018
 

Updated the webpage is an irritating process compared to adding new blog posts, but I’ve finally gotten around to updating the Aerospace Projects Review main page and the US Aerospace Projects catalog page:

http://aerospaceprojectsreview.com/

http://aerospaceprojectsreview.com/bomproj.htm

 

 Posted by at 12:10 am
Jan 232018
 

Currently winging their way from Ukraine to yours truly are two vintage brochures on the Antonov 225. These were picked up on ebay, purchases made possible by patrons of the APR Patreon. These brochures will in due course end up on the APR Patreon catalog, to be voted for as possible monthly rewards for the patrons.

If you’re interested in helping to preserve this sort of aerospace artifact, and also interested in getting high-rez scans of them, consider signing on to the APR Patreon.

 

 Posted by at 6:40 pm
Jan 072018
 

The L-2000 was Lockheed’s entrance into the mid-1960’s FAA contest to design and develop an American supersonic transport. The FAA wanted the US to have an SST substantially better than the Anglo-French Concorde, with up to 250 passengers and a cruise speed of up to Mach 3 (as fast as an SR-71). Interestingly, the Concorde was not expected to be a long0lived design, but rather was simply going to be the *first* SST, a technology demonstrator, a diplomatic endeavor between historic enemies Britain and France, a flying sales brochure for Angle-French industry. And the Tupolev Tu 144 was an attempt to put something, *anything*, into the air first.

In the end, the FAA selected the Boeing 2707 design, ending the L-2000. And after great promise was shown, politics killed the Boeing 2707, ending substantial forward progress in civil aviation. Since then, air flight has gotten cheaper and more efficient, but it has not gotten any faster… and it certainly hasn’t become more comfortable.

This artwork depicts the final or near-final L-2000 concept, a double-delta configuration vaguely like a larger Concorde in shape. The Boeing design started off as a swing-wing configuration but became a fixed, tailed design prior to cancellation.

 

I’ve uploaded the full rez scans to the 2018-01 APR Extras Dropbox folder, available to all current APR Patrons at the $4 level and above. If you are interested in this and a great many other “extras” and monthly aerospace history rewards, please sign up for the APR Patreon. Chances are good that $4/month is far cheaper than your espresso/booze budget!

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 Posted by at 7:09 pm
Jan 032018
 

Yeah, yeah, I’m no fan of “social media” either, but just as a reminder I have a Facebook page for Aerospace Projects Review. Right now it’s basically playing catchup with the APR blog (which, FYI, typically runs my aerospace projects stuff a day or so before they run on the Unwanted Blog). Honestly I’m at a loss to explain what added value the FB page has over the blog, but it’s there. I suppose if the blogs ever crash, like they’ve done a few times in years past, the Fb page might be the place to check to see if it is indeed a blog crash as opposed to me being dead or on the lam or some such. If the blogs *and* the Fb page go down at the same time… unless there’s some system wide attack on the internet, then chances are that either I’ve been specifically targeted, or I’ve finally given up all this stuff and have shut everything down and joined a cult or something.

https://www.facebook.com/Aerospace-Projects-Review-159434240833823/

If’n yer big in social media and what to share the APR Fb page… hey, great.

 Posted by at 11:14 pm
Sep 252017
 

Argh. Facebook is not my favorite thing. But, apparently, it’s where all the cool kids hang out, so the Aerospace Projects Review Facebook page that I cobbled together years ago, I’ve started posting things in again.

One of the weird things about Facebook is that you (apparently) can’t see a page unless you are signed in to Facebook, and if you are signed in, your own Facebook page when displayed to you has a bunch of editing features plastered all over it. Mine does, at any rate. So I can’t see what my own APR Facebook page looks like to other folks. Meh. So I don’t know if it looks ok or not. Anyone wants to wander by and let me know, that’d be great.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aerospace-Projects-Review/159434240833823

 Posted by at 2:16 am
Aug 232017
 

Thanks to some APR Patreon crowdfunders, I was able to procure a *giant* blueprint of the Grumman F7F Tigercat from ebay. Today I got it back from the print shop where it was scanned at 300 dpi, resulting in an image more than 29,000 pixels wide. The image was processed a little bit to reduce the file size from 900+ megabytes down to 100, and a half-size version and a B&W version. These files have been provided to the funders. The blueprint itself will now be sent on to a relevant and worthy museum or archive.

If you are interested in getting in on and helping with this sort of thing, consider signing up for the APR Patreon.

 

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 Posted by at 10:56 pm
Aug 032017
 

Hollywood goes back to the remake well for the billionth time, this time the 1974 “classic” Death Wish (a series of movies that I never care for because they were, well, just not at all good). This time, though, the remake has two things going for it:

1) Casting. Who better to play Paul Kersey than Bruce Willis?

2) The SJWs. They are already offended.

SJWs Melt Down over Bruce Willis’ ‘Death Wish’ Trailer: ‘Alt-Right,’ ‘Racist,’ ‘Nakedly Fascist’

I have a challenge. Watch the trailer and explain to me how:

A) Bruce Willis killing a bunch of fellow white guys is “racist”

B) Depicting the police – and the rest of the government- as completely ineffectual is “fascist.”

 

 Posted by at 8:07 pm
Jul 162017
 

Every month, patrons of the Aerospace Projects Review Patreon campaign are rewarded with a bundle of documents and diagrams, items of interest and importance to aerospace history. If you sign up, you get the monthly rewards going forwards; the “back issues” catalog lets patrons aid the APR cause by picking up items from before they signed on. The catalog, available to all patrons at the APR Patreon, has been updated to include everything from the beginning of the project back in 2014 on up to February, 2017.

Below are the items from 2016 (and the first two months of 2017):

 

If you are interested in any of these and in helping to fund the mission of Aerospace Projects Review, drop by the APR Patreon page and sign up. For only a few bucks a month you can help fund the procurement, scanning and dissemination of interesting aerospace documentation that might otherwise vanish from the public.

 Posted by at 12:52 am