Jan 082018
 

The Curtiss-Wright X-19 was a reasonably successful experimental tilt-prop VTOL aircraft from the first half of the 1960’s. Two aircraft were built; one crashed, one is at the USAF Museum in Dayton (I believe it’s in a restoration facility). The Defense Technical Information Center has two CW documents in PDF format that cover the technology of the X-19 in some detail:

THE X-19 V/STOL TECHNOLOGY: A CRITICAL REVIEW – final report

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THE X-19 V/STOL TECHNOLOGY: A CRITICAL REVIEW – technical report

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One of the documents includes a fold-out three-view diagram of the X-19, scanned in glorious Extra No color two-bit black and white as two separate pages. I’ve stitched them back together and tried to make the diagram look reasonably good; I’ve uploaded the full-rez result of my effort to the 2018-0 APR Extras folder on Dropbox, available to all APR patrons at the $4 level and higher.

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 Posted by at 11:13 pm
  • Michel Van

    thanks for scann and for links

  • B-Sabre

    It may have flown, but the design had some significant limitations – because it relied on relatively small-diameter propellors, it was going to have a fairly high disk loading compared to a helicopter, which means it was going to be be very inefficient compared to a helicopter in that mode of flight, and would also be susceptible to ring vortex state stalls, which has been a recurrent V-22 issue.

    I have a book on the X-19 and the whole design program, written by one of the designers. One day they told their bosses that controllability would be improved if they added cyclic pitch control (adjusting the pitch of one blade blade as it sweeps through a section of the rotation) to their existing collective pitch control (all blades adjust pitch simultaneously). They were told “If we add cyclic control, these things become rotors instead of propellors, and Curtiss-Wright is a propellor company.”