Twenty-first in the series of reconstructed drawings from Paul Suhler’s book “From RAINBOW to GUSTO.” This is the Lockheed A-10 design as drawn by Ed Baldwin in January 1959. This particular drawing has a Source Grade of four:

“RAINBOW to GUSTO” is available from Amazon:

To download the high-rez version of the A-10 drawing, simply click THIS LINK. You will be prompted for a username and a password. For the A-10 drawing, use these:

Username: the FIRST word in the body of the text on page 156

Password: the LAST word in the body of the text on page 156

(Remember: Case Sensitive!)

ALSO NOTE: if all you get is a “red X,” that means the image is too large for your browser to display (I’ve not had a problem with Firefox, but have had with IE). In that event, simply hit the Back button to this page, and right click on the link above and save the image directly to your computer and view from there.

Up next: A-11 configuration

Yesterday the crop duster went after the field just across the road. As a result, it flew really close to the house a few times. Surprisingly difficult to get photos of something trucking along at a hundred miles an hour at treetop level, coming at you from *behind* a house…

Twentieth in the series of reconstructed drawings from Paul Suhler’s book “From RAINBOW to GUSTO.” This is the Lockheed A-7-2 design as drawn by Ed Baldwin in January 1959. This particular drawing has a Source Grade of four:

“RAINBOW to GUSTO” is available from Amazon:

To download the high-rez version of the A-7-3 drawing, simply click THIS LINK. You will be prompted for a username and a password. For the A-7-3 drawing, use these:

Username: the FIRST word in the body of the text on page 141

Password: the LAST word in the body of the text on page 141

(Remember: Case Sensitive!)

ALSO NOTE: if all you get is a “red X,” that means the image is too large for your browser to display (I’ve not had a problem with Firefox, but have had with IE). In that event, simply hit the Back button to this page, and right click on the link above and save the image directly to your computer and view from there.

Up next: A-10 configuration

Nineteenth in the series of reconstructed drawings from Paul Suhler’s book “From RAINBOW to GUSTO.” This is the Lockheed A-7-2 design as drawn by Ed Baldwin in January 1959. This particular drawing has a Source Grade of four:

“RAINBOW to GUSTO” is available from Amazon:

To download the high-rez version of the A-7-2 drawing, simply click THIS LINK. You will be prompted for a username and a password. For the A-7-2 drawing, use these:

Username: the FIRST word in the body of the text on page 140

Password: the LAST word in the body of the text on page 140

(Remember: Case Sensitive!)

ALSO NOTE: if all you get is a “red X,” that means the image is too large for your browser to display (I’ve not had a problem with Firefox, but have had with IE). In that event, simply hit the Back button to this page, and right click on the link above and save the image directly to your computer and view from there.

Up next: A-7-3 configuration

The San Diego Aerospace Museum has posted a Northrop video, “The Story of the Flying Wing.” While the video is faded and the audio is, frankly, painful, it remains of some real historical interest. This was clearly a video meant for the ignernt public, not as a promotional video to the Air Force, so it’s got a lot of dumbed-down in it, including a lot of cartoons.

embedded by Embedded Video

YouTube Direkt

I think the narrator is the same narrator from “The War Of The Worlds,” which featured a Flying Wing dropping nukular whoopass on the Martians…

The *almost* final design that became the F-4 Phantom II:

The AGM-129 entered service and was withdrawn from service, all pretty much entirely without fanfare. It was a stealthy cruise missile with a faceted nose, a flush NACA-style inlet for its turbojet on the underside and flip-out forward swept wings. Very little information about this has been made public over the years; not even a decent layout drawing of the thing. Oddly, though, multiple AGM-129′s are on display at museums around the country. I’ve taken photos and measurements made by myself and others, along with a few simple but official General Dynamics diagrams, and constructed a set of layout drawings for the AGM-129.

I’ve also made available a high-rez version of this that prints out at 1/48 scale when printed at 300 dpi (fits on a standard sheet of paper). And it’s free of charge… *if* you have a copy of Aerospace Projects Review issue V1N1. When you click on the link to the drawing, you should be prompted for a username and password; the username is “v1n1,” and the password is… the first word on page 11 of V1N1 (remember that capitalization counts).

Just informed via email that someone showed the photos of the Turboprop Biplane to some Relevant People and one recognized it as being a Grumman concept. No further data.

In retrospect, the forward fuselage does bear a great deal of resemblance to the Grumman XF10F Jaguar. This would make sense… the XF10F was first envisioned in 1948, the same general time period as the Turboprop Biplane. The XF10F was a design for the Navy, which the T.B. seems to have been. The XF10F featured variable sweep wings, which, while not being biplane wings, did permit for short span while stored on board a crowded aircraft carrier… just as the biplane configuration seems to have. The XF10F was *not* a turboprop, however… so this design may have also been meant for pure jet power as well.

More than two years ago I posted photos of a large display model of yet another XF10F variant HERE. Ah, good times. Here, let me cut-and-paste some of that earlier post…

NOTE: Researching all this wacky stuff takes time and money. You can support the cause by Buying My Stuff, which includes aerospace drawings and documents, as well as the journal of unbuilt aircraft and spacecraft projects, Aerospace Projects Review.

Or just plain Give Me Money.

Hint, hint…

One of the models I made master parts for Fantastic Plastic models was the 1/72 scale “Whispercraft” helicopter from the movie “The Sixth Day.” This was, IMO, one of my more entertainingly engineered kits, with lots of movable parts and options. Due to financial restrictions, it had no cockpit innards. And due to something happening with the molds and/or the master parts, it had a very limited production run and has been unavailable for some time.

There has apparently been enough interest shown that we are looking at re-releasing the kit, this time with full cockpit details. Also of *potential* interest is releasing a few extra parts to make a military variant. This would be invented out of whole cloth. I created a few clay “mockups” of potential alternate forward fuselage configurations, shown below. These are not meant to be the final designs, but instead are simply quickly-sculpted “sketches” to show possibilities.

If you are interested in a Whispercraft model, let me know via comments. Also, if you are interested in a Whispercraft and find one or another of the “alternate configurations” appealing, let me know that, too. if there is enough interest shown, the project will go forward, and probably with the alternate configuration that there is the most interest in.

First: a “conventional” configuration

Second: a “duck nose” configuration

Third: a tandem-seater like the Mil-24 “Hind”

Fourth: an asymmetrical configuration, like the Boeing AAH entry.

Fifth: a faceted “stealth configuration

Eighteenth in the series of reconstructed drawings from Paul Suhler’s book “From RAINBOW to GUSTO.” This is the Lockheed A-6-9 design as drawn by Dan Zuck in January 1959. This particular drawing has a Source Grade of four:

“RAINBOW to GUSTO” is available from Amazon:

To download the high-rez version of the A-6-9 drawing, simply click THIS LINK. You will be prompted for a username and a password. For the A-6-9 drawing, use these:

Username: the FIRST word in the body of the text on page 136

Password: the LAST word in the body of the text on page 136

(Remember: Case Sensitive!)

ALSO NOTE: if all you get is a “red X,” that means the image is too large for your browser to display (I’ve not had a problem with Firefox, but have had with IE). In that event, simply hit the Back button to this page, and right click on the link above and save the image directly to your computer and view from there.

Up next: A-7-2 configuration

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