Dec 272013
 

Be sure to check out the Complete Catalog for all the drawings and documents.

 

Saturn I Summary

A 44 page NASA brochure (from somewhen around 1965) describing all the Saturn I vehicles that were launched. Includes diagrams showing the different configurations and provides mission data and highlights.

sdoc65
—————————————————————————–
—————————————————————————–
The Retro-Glide Booster Concept

A 20-page collection of information on the Martin-Marietta “Retro-Glide Booster,” an early Shuttle idea for using a winged and recoverable derivative of the Saturn V first stage. A 1971 NASA Space Shuttle History Project document.

sdoc66
—————————————————————————–
—————————————————————————–
NB-36H Aircraft Descriptive Data

30 pages of Lockheed data on the Convair NB-36H (the B-36 equipped with a nuclear reactor for test purposes). This comes from the Lockheed “Competitive Data Group,” which was Lockheed’s collection of intelligence data on *other* companies designs and proposals. This report, largely hand-written, provides a program history as well as weight and dimensional data, with a number of sketches showing the general arrangement and internal layout.

adoc25
—————————————————————————–
—————————————————————————–
Handbook on Guided Missiles

212 pages of a 1946 War Department report on German and Japanese rocket powered missiles and aircraft. This rarely-seen classic (scanned from a photocopy) provides a vast pile of information, including a great many diagrams.

adoc26
—————————————————————————–
—————————————————————————–
Saturn Foldout

A NASA-Marshall publicity brochure on the Saturn V, dating to the mid-late 1960’s. Prints out full-size to 34 1/4 inches by 9 1/2 inches

sdoc67

 Posted by at 3:59 pm
Dec 012013
 

I am in the process of reworking my web pages. Part of this is consolidating all the stuff into more compact, less graphically intense (and, I imagine, annoying) forms; part of this is standardizing the prices. All Aerospace Drawings are now only $3; all Aerospace Documents are only $4. The “canonical” catalog is now hosted on the aerospaceprojectsreview.com web page; the pages on up-ship.com/blog are obsolete and will be changed out ASAP.

The new Aerospace Drawings & Documents catalog (includes APR & USBP)

The new Cyanotype Blueprints catalog

 Posted by at 10:46 am
Nov 142013
 

A decade ago I released Aerospace Projects Review solely in printed form… in the form of simple 11X17 sheets stapled down the centerline. In recent years I’ve released it – and other aerospace documents – instead in PDF format, and also as a high-quality print-on-demand version. While the PDF versions are quick and cost effective, they don’t fit on a bookshelf. The Magcloud versions are good, but a bit limiting… one page size. No foldouts.

And one common feature of both PDF and MagCloud: They’re very “modern.” Most of the time, that’s just fine. But sometimes… old-school just seems a whole lot more appropriate.

I’ve picked up some old-fashioned report covers that use the folding metal prongs, the type that used to be pretty ubiquitous in aerospace offices. A generation and more ago, if you wanted to put out a report, or just bind together a bunch of stuff, this is what you’d use. In recent years, of course, these binders have fallen out of fashion, replaced with spiral bindings, 3-ring binders, or just plain scanned PDF documents and the like. It’s been a number of years since I’ve seen these things in the wild, either in office supply stores or in use. But they *scream* “this is how it’s done, son.” I’ve used large format versions of these on the recent X-20 Dyna Soar diagram set I out on eBay.

I’ve got the harebrained notion of making available a number of old reports, and things like Aerospace Projects Review, in this format. This is a lot of work (for me) compared to the PDF/print-on-demand options, but the end result is quite a bit different from the others. As a first test, I’ve re-worked the first four US Bomber Project issues into one publication, with the diagrams reformatted and rescaled for 11X17 foldouts. Here are photos of the first test :

Dsc_1010 Dsc_1009 Dsc_1007 Dsc_1006 Dsc_1008

If people are interested, I’ve already pulled out a fat stack of reports to release in this format (a number of Saturn program reports, aircraft pilots manuals, design studies, rocket engine manuals, etc.). Price would be variable, based on length, but they’d be less than a print-on-demand version, as well as including foldouts where appropriate. So, the question is… how much interest is there?

There is a bit more formatting needed for the US Bomber Projects version, obviously. Anyone want this prototype? Call it $20 plus postage.

Might come a time when I embark on true Aerospace Hispter Art Overload: using these binders to put together collections of cyanotype blueprints on vellum… that would be awesome.

 Posted by at 11:10 pm
Apr 262013
 

I’ve been tinkering with vellum. I’ve found to my serious annoyance that the most available vellum, that produced by Clearprint, is damn near water repellant; getting the cyanotyping fluid to soak in has proven to be a challenge that I have so far failed to adequately succeed at. The results are, when I work really, really hard and expend a lot of the fluid, at best “meh.” Another brand, Pacific Arc, which seems to be available solely through Hobby Lobby, is substantially more receptive to the fluid. About half the time, the results are “fricken’ awesome.”  Half the time, “meh.”

Today I finally took delivery of large format transparencies. Included are the masks for the 1/72 Saturn V and Ib diagrams, several V-2 diagrams (an engine diagram for 18X24 and a layout w/profiles for 18X24, and a very large V-2 cutaway), a large NERVA diagram, and a large bit of NERVA artwork that I have doubts about. I’ve successfully made 18X24 cyanotpyes on vellum for the two V-2 diagrams… and all goes well, tomorrow, two trials of the nearly 6-foot-long Saturn V.

Back in the day, cyanotyping was apparently a straightforward process, with machines that would make sure that results were good an uniform and cost effective. I’m still working on trying to obtain uniformity, but I’m getting closer.  Vellum is a lot more challenging in that respect than watercolor paper, but when it all works right, the results can be spectacular.

Those of you who contributed to the “Space Station V/new computer project,” guess what’s coming…

 Posted by at 8:50 pm
Nov 152012
 

Until a few days ago, it had been many weeks (a couple of months, I believe) since I’d last received an order for one of the cyanotype prints. But with Up Goer 5, there were a few orders that came in all at once. I was short on some of them, so I’m working on printing up new ones at this time. I plan on shipping them all early next week, latest.

Also: I’ve been experimenting with alternate paper. Most paper either turns to mush or curls up and dies when it gets wet, as blueprints made this fashion must (they must first be painted with a water-based photoreactive dye or ink, and then mus be hosed down). I’ve been using watercolor paper to this point, as it stands up to the process; but it’s not practical for larger format prints, as it’s not readily available in larger sizes. And while it looks great framed hanging on a wall, it’s not historically representative. Today I’ve been testing out several different vellum papers, and have been having promising results. Velum has the dual advantage of being available on rolls, and being historically accurate. So at some point in the future, larger-format cyanotype blueprints will be made available on vellum. The specific target is of course the six-foot-long Saturn V, but others are possible as well. The current infrastructure I have on hand will permit up to a bit short of 2 foot by 3 foot. The only thing preventing *that* right now is a lack of ability to procure 2X3 transparencies… but I am assured that that ability is coming.

 Posted by at 2:36 pm
Sep 112012
 

A short-term sale… just a few hours. So act fast! All downloadable drawings and documents and APRs, as well as Reichdream items. Sale excludes matter-mail items and APR subscriptions. Minimum order: $25.

There has *got* to be a way to do this with Paypal in a way that doesn’t seem lame, but I don’t know what it is. So, here’s what I’ve come up with: order the “coupon” below (a nominal fifty cents), and at least $25 more items… and I will refund you 40% of the total. More steps than would seem necessary, but I think it should be workable.

Remember to order the “coupon” and the items all in one order. Otherwise… it won’t work. No “coupon,” no savings…

Sale has ended.

 Posted by at 9:04 am
Jul 012012
 

Now available: Bell Aircraft drawing 58-701-008, “General Arrangement Model 58D, ” dated 6-30-1948. This is the X-1D rocket powered supersonic aircraft.

This blueprint, measuring 12,943X5513 pixels (43.1X18.4 inches, printed off at 300dpi), was scanned in pieces and in full color from a blue-line original some years ago. The sheer size of it proved to be too much for my computers to bear in the reassembly phase, and had to await newer, more powerful systems. Now at last it’s available. This blueprint is presented as-is, with stains, tears, fold marks and all… these add character to the print that a pristine version would lack, while taking away none of the historical, technical or artistic value. Additionally, a cleaned-up grayscale version is included.

Also includes  halfsize and quartersize versions of each for easier viewing and printing.

Air drawing 61 can be downloaded for $5.00.

————

————-

 Posted by at 10:46 am
Jul 012012
 

Now available: Bell Aircraft drawing 52-700-002, “Inboard Profile MX-743 Research Airplane,” dated 12-12-1946, updated 3-30-1955. This is the X-2 rocket powered supersonic aircraft.

This blueprint, measuring 21,010X5580 pixels (70X18.6 inches, printed off at 300dpi), was scanned in pieces and in grayscale from a black-line original some years ago. The sheer size of it proved to be too much for my computers to bear in the reassembly phase, and had to await newer, more powerful systems. Now at last it’s available. This blueprint is presented as-is, with stains, tears, fold marks and all… these add character to the print that a pristine version would lack, while taking away none of the historical, technical or artistic value. Additionally, a cleaned-up version is included.

Also includes halfsize and quartersize versions of each for easier viewing and printing.

Air drawing 60 can be downloaded for $7.00.
———–

———–

 Posted by at 10:45 am
Jul 012012
 

Now available: Bell Aircraft drawing 40-976-001, “General Arrangement 3 View Model 40 Airplane.” Dated 3-14-1944, this presents the design that would be built as the twin-jet XP-83 long range fighter. Interior arrangement is shown within the general arrangement.

This blueprint, measuring 13,850X5500 pixels (46.2X18.3 inches, printed off at 300dpi), was scanned in pieces and in full color from a blue-line original some years ago. The sheer size of it proved to be too much for my computers to bear in the reassembly phase, and had to await newer, more powerful systems. Now at last it’s available. This blueprint is presented as-is, with stains, tears, fold marks and all… these add character to the print that a pristine version would lack, while taking away none of the historical, technical or artistic value.

Also includes halfsize and quartersize versions for easier viewing and printing.

Air drawing 59 can be downloaded for $7.00.

————

————

 Posted by at 10:45 am